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Facebook and Advertising Errors

Facebook has been at the front of the news over the past few days and not for a good reason. For the 10th time in the last year the company has admitted to mistakes in their advertising analytics. This time around the company miscategorized certain clicks from mobile users and mistakenly charged advertisers as if every click made by the mobile user was actually a visit to the website of the advertiser.

Facebook has several models for advertising and the advertisers affected by this all used the “pay per click” module. This means the advertisers were paying for clicks that never happened. This is not the first time Facebook has been accused of misrepresenting data (as seen by the ten other times it has happened this year.) Facebook also has been accused of over-estimating the amount of views on videos posted on the website and is currently being audited by the Media Ratings Council.

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Advertising’s Increase on Twitter

Social media has become an increasingly prevalent advertisement hub and even the most resistant platforms have begun to see the effects of this. Twitter began as a social network without advertising built into the core stream of engagements between users. The site used to rely on an endless stream of posts from those figures the user chose to follow.

Things have changed as of the start of 2016 and now Twitter has several different ways of advertising. There are now call to action buttons, promoted tweets, promoted accounts and “who to follow” sections that point users towards engagements with specific figures. The call to action buttons have generated the best response through examples such

 

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Virtual Reality and Video Games

The video game market is changing in an exciting way with the introduction of Virtual Reality technology. As long as can be remembered video games have simply been played on either a small handheld device or a large television screen or computer monitor. With the introduction of VR technology everything that was thought to be known about video game design has been turned upside down.

 

There is a brand new market for immersive, 360 degree video games that require entirely different metrics for design and are played very differently from standard video games. This has led to a wide-open market for the design and development of these games, and the companies willing to take a risk with them have a chance at turning huge profits.

 

Valve is currently the leading company pioneering VR games with a current selection of five games on their Steam marketplace.

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Micro-transactions and their impact on RuneScape

Micro-transactions have become a driving force by which many mobile gaming companies manage to turn a profit, but what happens when these controversial transactions are added to a long-standing MMORPG? An MMORPG is a Massively Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Game which means that player interaction is at the forefront of the game and often viewed by developers as the defining metric of their game. RuneScape is an MMORPG that has been around since 2001 that has slowly started to decline over the past 5 years. In order to attempt to change their business model, Jagex, the company that owns RuneScape introduced micro-transactions, which essentially allow players to buy ‘success’ in the game.

Fast forward 5 years later after micro-transactions have been introduced: RuneScape’s player-base is on the decline and Jagex has been scrambling to retain players. They even went as far as to re-introduce a 2007 version of the game with no micro-transactions to appease players. As time has passed it has become increasingly clear that adding micro-transactions was not a successful business idea, and Jagex is still paying the price.

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TF2Outpost, Revolutionizing Digital Currency

One of the largest growing digital markets currently exists on a game platform called Steam. Owned by a company named Valve Software, Steam is a multi-game platform that includes many blockbuster titles such as Counter Strike, Team Fortress 2 and many others. These games have in-game currencies (treasure keys, promotional items, cosmetic items) that have value in the real world that are determined as a part of the vast Steam ecosystem.

This all sounds great, but there is a problem. How does one player find another player willing to exchange items in one game for items from another game? How does this player accurately research the market in order to determine what is a fair exchange? TF2Outpost.com has come up with the solution. The creator of TF2Outpost had the goal of creating a centralized hub to allow players to exchange items between different games as well as advertise potential trades they would like to make. TF2Outpost operates on a subscriber model, generating revenue from customers who enjoy the website enough to pay a monthly subscription. Overall, this website provides a valuable service to the entire community that plays Steam games, while also turning a decent profit.

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